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Video Transcript:

Aaron Parkinson:
I'll tell you the story behind my Facebook shirt.

Jason Drohn:
What's up? This is Jason Drohn. Welcome to Sales Systems Experts, episode number seven, where we talk about marketing automation tips and buyer journeys. And I am joined by Aaron Parkinson. So how are you, good sir?

Aaron Parkinson:
Well, I'm double barreling today because I've got the Hulk.

Jason Drohn:
Yeah.

Aaron Parkinson:
And I've got the shirt.

Jason Drohn:
Nice. There you go.

Aaron Parkinson:
And this shirt is directly from Facebook headquarters. You cannot get them anywhere else. I've never worn it. Think I had it for like two years.

Jason Drohn:
Right.

Aaron Parkinson:
And I thought, today I'll break it out for our show.

Jason Drohn:
Very nice.

Aaron Parkinson:
It's my very fancy special Facebook shirt.

Jason Drohn:
So is there like a merchandise counter at Facebook where you go? Or do they just give them out for free?

Aaron Parkinson:
Well, this one was given to me. But they do have a merch store there, but it's their very specific blue, their very specific font. So you can only get it at Facebook headquarters, and-

Jason Drohn:
And they're copyright protected or trademarked.

Aaron Parkinson:
I'm sure. It's probably listening to me right now talking. Probably collecting data. Probably analyzing my BMI and all sorts of things, but I don't even know. Probably a microchip in the collar. But yeah.

Aaron Parkinson:
So we're talking today about marketing automation tips and follow-ups. Really kind of go hand in hand. So maybe, you or I can do it, is sort of giving people the lay of the land of when you're creating an offer... And I want to talk a little bit about this today too, what the difference between the brand and the offer is. But when you're creating an offer, there's a certain baseline of conversions to a sale. If you're in e-commerce, it's how many people visit the site? How many buy the product? How many buy the upsell, the downsell? What do they add to their cart? What is their lifetime value? Or what is their average order value?

Aaron Parkinson:
And then there is all these marketing automation tips that can be put into play that then traditionally from our experience, and I'll use e-commerce as the example today, can boost the average order value or the return on your paid media by as much as 40%. And if you don't have that 40% in play, then it's almost like running a race with one leg. It's very, very difficult to get to the amount of revenue you need, to justify the costs of paid media. And we specialize in paid media, so. It's all about getting the ROI on that dollar invested.

Aaron Parkinson:
So for me, when we take on an e-commerce client, we look at what their baseline conversion is through their product offering. And then we look at five different sectors of where they can increase their return on their ad spend. And so I'm talking about it from an e-commerce standpoint. You can probably talk to it even more in-depth from an info marketing standpoint. But maybe I'll give you my hit list of e-commerce stuff when we deal with a store. These are the things that we check right away.

Aaron Parkinson:
So the first thing that we check is, do they have their email set up appropriately? And when we're talking about email, your order confirmation email. Your abandoned cart email. Your onboarding series for your email, some people call that a nurturing email series. And then your promotional calendar. So we got four different sectors there.

Aaron Parkinson:
Number one, your confirmation email. So many people undervalue their confirmation email because they just think it's supposed to be that thing that says, "Here's your receipt." But it's the one that people open the most.

Jason Drohn:
Yeah.

Aaron Parkinson:
Right? So offering some type of call to action inside of there is super, super valuable. Just a really simple thing you can do is say, "Thank you so much for your order. Here's your confirmation receipt. Here's a special promo code that you can use," right, "To get an additional 20% off of anything, if you use it in the next 24 hours," right. "Use the promo, click here, go back to the store." And people like, "Oh, I get a bonus if I use it today." You'll have a certain percentage of people that'll take that. Right.

Aaron Parkinson:
Your abandoned cart email series. Right. I mean, our abandoned cart email series was responsible for almost 2% of our revenue in our store. So somebody gets to a cart, they don't finish their order, they get an email series that says, "Hey, you left this in your cart. Do you want to continue? Do you want to buy it? Time's ticking down," kind of thing. You can pick up another automated chunk of money right there.

Aaron Parkinson:
Then in your onboarding and nurturing series, so, "Thank you so much for buying with us. Over the next couple of days, you're going to learn more about our company and what we do and why we launched it, what makes us tick," blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, traditional nurturing series. Inside of that, there can always be subtle or aggressive links and calls to action back to your store, where ultimately people are going to shop some more.

Aaron Parkinson:
And Ezra Firestone is a friend of mine who owns BOOM by Cindy Joseph. He was showing something the other day were on his About Us page, so the story of the business of the brand, the people who go to that page and click on the link, he has a call to action on his About Us page to visit the store, are the highest converting people of any place that he possibly has.

Jason Drohn:
It's interesting.

Aaron Parkinson:
Because they're reading the heart and the soul of the brand. And if they resonated with it, they almost want to be like, "Yeah. This is what I'm all about. I'm going to click here." And again, that's just another automated place. And I never really thought about it to be honest with you until he told me that. I've never put a call to action to shop the store on an About Us page. But he's like, "These are the most valuable customers we have." So that's another automated entry point that can pick it up.

Aaron Parkinson:
And then last but not least, a promotional calendar. Right? So if you're like, "Hey, I'm going to launch a new product," or, "I'm going to feature a new product," or whatever, "and I'm going to do it on these three days a month," you can set that up way ahead of time. Emails go out, countdowns go down to when the sale ends, or the promo ends. And then you'll pick up...

Aaron Parkinson:
And email for us in our e-commerce store accounted for over 10% of our monthly revenue. And I know that in the info-marketing world, this is like breathing. Everybody... I've been teaching info-marketing since the mid-2000s. And if you didn't have a follow-up email series and a promotional series and all, you're a moron. But in e-commerce, I think a lot of people undervalue it. And it was 10% of our revenue. And more importantly, it's not the same revenue. Because there's no advertising cost associated with it.

Jason Drohn:
Right.

Aaron Parkinson:
So where you might spend 50% of your advertising dollars acquiring a customer, you're spending no money in the email to sell to that customer. So the profit margin on those sales is exponentially more value, increasing the revenue of the business by 10%, but it might only cost you-

Jason Drohn:
Nothing.

Aaron Parkinson:
Yeah. It's as much as whatever the email autoresponder costs you per month. So it's free marketing. It's automated and it's free. And so many people just undervalue it.

Jason Drohn:
Don't do anything with it.

Aaron Parkinson:
So just don't do it. And we would email every single day.

Jason Drohn:
Yeah. Totally.

Aaron Parkinson:
And a lot of people will say, "Oh, that's too aggressive." But I'm, we did it. And it ended accounted for... Every time we sent an email we made $1,400. And it didn't even have to be good. I mean, it's better if it's good, but.

Jason Drohn:
Right. I have a friend, e-comm friend who, he sends two emails a day, every day, morning and afternoon. Morning is an offer, the afternoon is bonding and content. So every day, two emails.

Aaron Parkinson:
And I'd be interested to see what his number or her number is.

Jason Drohn:
Yeah. So he's got 350,000 people on his email list. So he's, yeah.

Aaron Parkinson:
Yeah. We had 1.4 million on that list. And the open rates when you're emailing all the time, they go down and they go down.

Jason Drohn:
Oh yeah, yeah. Totally.

Aaron Parkinson:
So we'd have to scrape them and clean it up and do all that kind of stuff. But, it didn't matter. We'd send an email, we'd make $1,400. And for 20 minutes of your time. Because it's usually a template or something. And you can set it up completely automated for 30 days. Just let it do its thing, right.

Jason Drohn:
Just go through. Yeah. Totally.

Aaron Parkinson:
Absolutely. How do you see that apply to the more info marketing side?

Jason Drohn:
So the same thing. You have your transactional emails. So the transactional email would be you downloaded a report, you bought something, the invoice gets sent out and all that stuff. So of course that needs to be set up. In the info-marketing, in the coaching space, it's important to realize that it's not, you turn on the traffic and you get sales. Like with e-comm in a lot of situations, physical products just generally have a higher conversion on the sales page than a digital product because it's not tangible. So physical product, you might have 6%, 8%, 10% conversions. If it's on Amazon, it might be 16%. Whereas digital product, half a percent, 1%, 2%, 3% is what you're a little bit more accustomed to seeing.

Jason Drohn:
So the buyer journey typically takes a little bit longer. There's a more knowledgeable, like, and trust factor that needs to be built up because it isn't a physical product. You're not receiving anything. You're receiving something digital, so. So the thing that I try to impress upon clients is, it isn't they click an ad, they go buy something. Oftentimes it's they click an ad. Then they watch a video. Then they read down the page. Then they click another page. Then it goes through an order form. Then they have to go find their credit card. There are lots of little microtransactions that have to transpire to get them to purchase.

Jason Drohn:
And in the marketing automation tips game, each of those little microtransactions, oftentimes you can trigger an email that goes out. So somebody hits... For us, for instance, if somebody hits one of our sales pages, and we have their email address, they get automatically added into a sequence that fires out and says, "Hey, we noticed you were on this page. So now let's send you six emails in a day because I know you're hyper-aware of this thing right now."

Jason Drohn:
So then they come to the page and then they click the Add to Cart button. Then they go to the order form. Well now that puts them in a different email sequence and that's the cart abandonment sequence. So in that, if the order isn't processed in 30 minutes, they get an email from us that says, "Hey, your, shopping cart is still full. You still got those special savings," or whatever, "That is in your shopping cart."

Jason Drohn:
Then once they buy, they get that order confirmation. And then we tell them, "Here's your thing. Within the next couple of days, we're going to be emailing you a free webinar or a free video," or whatever. "So make sure you read this thing, because it's important for your growth, your future success," whatever. And then, "Look forward to the next few things that we're going to be emailing you."

Jason Drohn:
And that's if there's no upsells. If there is an upsell in the process, then we send them what is called an ascension email sequence. So they bought the front end thing, but not the upsell. So we then send them a bunch of emails to try to get them to buy that upsell. And if they bought that, but not this, we send them a bunch of emails to try to get them to buy that. So we step them up through the process. And if they don't buy anything, we send them a couple of other front end offers sideways. So they didn't buy this thing, so we want them to buy this thing. And then this thing. So that's how-

Aaron Parkinson:
Something that might be in alignment with what we were trying to sell them, but just wasn't the right fit.

Jason Drohn:
Right. So, and if you have multiple products, you can sell multiple products sideways like that. Or you can sell affiliate offers, which is what a lot of our clients do that don't have multiple offers. So just because somebody didn't buy from you doesn't mean they don't like you. Or it doesn't mean they don't like the thing, the product, whatever. It might be that you didn't resonate with them. Or your page didn't catch their attention. Or it was, people just don't buy for men or women or the age was wrong or whatever. So maybe there's an affiliate offer that you can mail them too. You're still capturing some revenue, so generating some cash flow. But it's not necessarily selling your thing. Does that make sense?

Aaron Parkinson:
It makes perfect sense to me. It may not make any sense to anybody looking at the video.

Jason Drohn:
Right.

Aaron Parkinson:
But it makes perfect sense to me. The second marketing automation tips that I want to talk about is retargeting. And from an e-commerce standpoint, so I wore the Facebook shirt today, there's a whole bunch of statistics thrown all over the place. Like a customer needs to see your offer seven times before they convert or 14 or 21, or just depends on who you talk to. Right? So for us, anytime somebody watches a video or anytime somebody clicks on our page or anytime somebody engages with our social media, that's the first interaction.

Aaron Parkinson:
A lot of people think the first interaction is the first time they go to your site or they give you an email or they buy, and it's not. It's the first time they engage with anything you do. It could just be watching 10 seconds of a video. It could be liking your fan page. It could be Googling your stuff and ending up on one of your blog posts or whatever. Right. So the whole idea is if we're targeting the United States and there are 400 X million people, and all of a sudden 20 million of them take some action somewhere, then you don't want to be marketing to the 400 million anymore. Because that's expensive and it's the shotgun approach and scattered. You want to market to the 20 million who already put their hands up and said, "I have some interest in what's going on here."

Aaron Parkinson:
And that's where you can start to set up automated retargeting campaigns based on different events inside of Facebook, inside of Instagram, inside of Google, inside of YouTube. Wherever you're pulling data in, you can structure them. You can send them content about your company. You can send them case studies about your product. You can send them testimonials from people unboxing it. You can send them promotional material.

Aaron Parkinson:
The longer they're on without buying, you can just send them promotional stuff that's accelerating in aggression, where, "You've seen my stuff for 30 days, but you haven't bought. Well, I'm going to offer you a 10% discount today. 60 days, I'm going to offer you a 30% discount. 90 days of seeing my stuff and you're still not buying, I'm putting the hammer down to get you in." Because once we get them to be a buyer, then that's like the holy grail. It might be a 50% discount in 90 days or whatever. Right?

Aaron Parkinson:
And so we structure all of that media retargeting up as part of our campaigns automatically. And then a lot of cases we'll use outside services as well, like AdRoll right? And AdRoll is just basically an automated way to get your banner advertisement. Which, I see doneforyou.com everywhere I go, for example. And it's just an automated way to get your banner up across all of the inventory of banners that are available everywhere. And if you've ever clicked on something and then you see their ads in banners on every site you visit forever, you can do that through Google. Or you can just do it through a simple service like AdRoll.

Aaron Parkinson:
And typically for us, if we add AdRoll into a client's account, it will attribute somewhere between 5 to 10% of their sales, automatically add a return on ad spend that's seven to 10 one. Because it's all retargeting base. The people already know the product. They already know the customer, or they already know the business. It's not fresh. It's retargeting. They already know about it. So you offer them a little discount or something to get them off their butt. You don't even have to offer them a discount. It's just the fact that they're seeing it everywhere-

Jason Drohn:
Everywhere.

Aaron Parkinson:
And following them. Setting up those types of retargeting marketing automation tips. When we have our campaign structured, we'll see what we call the warm audience, the retargeting audience, we'll see that convert at somewhere between a five to an eight times return on ad spend. Whereas a cold audience might be a two. Right. So the whole goal is to blend them all to get ultimately the average that you want out. And much of it, there's lots of creative testing that goes on to improve it. But just putting it in and automating it will increase your revenue and cut down on your cost per acquisitions tremendously.

Jason Drohn:
Totally.

Aaron Parkinson:
So. I don't know if you have anything genius to add to that.

Jason Drohn:
Well, two things. So AdRoll has an email marketing functionality now. So if AdRoll can find the email address for somebody who visits your website, then it will send out templated emails to them. And you can segment it like a sequence, so. Which is super sweet. I just turned it on last week. So you're probably going to be getting some email from me. Not from me, but AdRoll.

Aaron Parkinson:
Awesome.

Jason Drohn:
So, which is cool. Also in the whole buyer journey, it's important to realize in setting up the retargeting campaigns, that people are either getting warmer to your offer or colder from your offer. And Aaron mentioned it in giving bigger discounts as people are leaving or they're cooling off from your offer. One thing is, how you would set it up inside Facebook is you create audiences. So the audience might be, if they've been to my website within 30 days, then they see this ad. If they've been to my website in 30 to 60 days, they see this ad. And then you step it out.

Jason Drohn:
We oftentimes have done it as small windows, as small as seven days. So basically we treat the seven-day windows like little mini autoresponder sequences, where we're throwing a different offer, a different lead magnet, a different thing in front of them, so. Because they are cooling off. And if they cool off enough, then you might need to pivot them into a different offer or a different lead magnet or a different thing because they've maybe already found a solution that wasn't you. So it's just an interesting thing to think about.

Aaron Parkinson:
Absolutely. When you start to see that type of retargeting being set up, you know that the person knows what they're doing. Because most people won't go that. We talk about retargeting buyers. That's the funny thing. Lots of people won't set up retargeting post the buy. Once they got the buy they're like, "I won."

Jason Drohn:
Yeah, right. No, there are six more offers.

Aaron Parkinson:
Yeah. Why are we not retargeting with more stuff that we have, and selling those things? They're your best leads. Let's sell them more stuff.

Aaron Parkinson:
So we see a lot of people stop that retargeting process at that point. And they leave a lot of money on the table. From an e-commerce standpoint, one of the hot things, but it's been nerve-wracking, is SMS. And with SMS, with text advertising, the open rate is-

Jason Drohn:
It's crazy.

Aaron Parkinson:
... or email, 17% on average or whatever. Where SMS is 90 something percent. Even if they don't open it, they see it and it goes ding on your phone. And it's super, super effective and super simple to set up those automated SMS. And you can use that for all the same things as email autoresponders. Like, "Hey, your order's on the way," or, "Hey, here's a special discount or, "Hey, here's our promotional calendar."

Aaron Parkinson:
And some of the e-comm guys that I work with, SMS especially around Black Friday, Cyber Monday, played an unbelievably massive role in their revenue and their sales.

Jason Drohn:
Interesting.

Aaron Parkinson:
But on the same side, the laws are so strict on text marketing that you have to dot your I's and cross your T's. You're going to text somebody, on your order page it has to be very clear. There's the very specific legal language you have to use around it. Like, "Hey, I check this box and I agreed to receive shipping notifications, promotional emails," or promotional texts.

Aaron Parkinson:
When you're doing outbound texts, there has to be an indication of where they can click to stop. It's a very, very specific ruleset. And if you break those rule sets, there are lawyers all over America that will opt-in in different places looking to trap you and looking to settle with you for a big lump sum.

Aaron Parkinson:
Because I think the law says, for every text you send out illegally to somebody, it's something like, I don't know, it was like a $10 per text fine. Enormous. And I remember being at an event a year and a half ago where a guy, very successful guy, eight-figure e-commerce guy, came into the room at the event we were at in full-blown tears. And he's like, "We just got hit with a $180 million SMS lawsuit."

Jason Drohn:
Oh wow.

Aaron Parkinson:
It goes big, fast. It's egregious the fines for it. So it's effective, but you just have to make sure that you just follow the letter of the law to a T. And if you do, you have nothing to be concerned about. But you got to make sure you don't slip up. Or you'll be in trouble, so.

Aaron Parkinson:
I don't know. How much SMS do you layer into your stuff?

Jason Drohn:
We do SMS here and there. Whenever it's event-based. So we have a couple of live streams, a live stream client working right now. So we send out SMS to his people. They have opted in for SMS notifications because it was basically to send a reminder about the live stream. So they are good. Other than that, we try not to be invasive with SMS, just in general as a rule.

Jason Drohn:
Sometimes I appreciate them. I just put in an embroidered t-shirt order. So I got an SMS that said, "Your stuff is hitting the assembly line," or the printing line or whatever. Which was super cool. It was like, "Oh, all right, got it. So it'll be here in like four or five days." But otherwise, some of them are like, "10% discount." And it's like, "You could've just emailed it to me."

Aaron Parkinson:
Yeah. It sort of like this story I read the other day and I was laughing. If you think back to the 1950s, right, if somebody showed up to your door and knocked, it was this major event. Like, "Oh my goodness. Sally's here! Let's get out fine China and let's get some cake and some coffee. Everybody, Sally's here!" And everyone's, "Oh! Somebody showed up to visit us." And everyone was so excited. And now if somebody shows up unknown and knocks on my door, I'm losing my mind. "What is happening here?" I am so offended and so angry that somebody is knocking on my door without telling me they're coming.

Aaron Parkinson:
And it's sort of the same thing with email, right. Everybody gets emails. They expect to get emailed. They're like, "Hm." But SMS is a level up. Like, "What are you doing texting my phone?" Right. And then a phone call now. When somebody calls my phone, even if it's one of my friends, they're just randomly... I'm like, "What are you doing? No prep text? No preface of what we're... What, do you think I got all the time in the world?" Right. It's funny how we've evolved as a species, and what irritates us. And SMS is a level up from email and then outbound phone calls is another level up from SMS. So you got to be cautious about when and where you use them and use them wisely so that you get the most impact out of it.

Aaron Parkinson:
As far as the next marketing automation tips for us, and again, I think a lot of people overlook it and we've talked about it before, is just the upsell and downsell paths. Right? We pick up an average, again, of another 10% of revenue through upsells and downsell paths. And people, they know they should do it, but they don't for whatever reason. And even if they do, usually they'll throw in one and they won't test it.

Aaron Parkinson:
And upsells and downsell paths and e-comm are reasonably easy. You can just offer more of the same thing at a discount. Or you can offer something that matches, where you can say, "Hey, get one as a gift for a friend." There are a few that are pretty standard. And then your downsell is just a better deal on the upsell. But putting one, in my mind, is mandatory. Putting three is ideal. There is no too much. People like, "Oh, I get offended when there's 8,000 upsells." Well, then don't buy them.

Jason Drohn:
Right.

Aaron Parkinson:
I'm more concerned about the cart value than the fact that you didn't like seeing all the upsells. It's expensive to buy media, so. And the things can be set up, tested for a month, find an optimal number, and then you just leave them. And they're just checking along. And in e-commerce, I feel like more people overlook it. Whereas in info-marketing it's the business model. It's mandatory.

Aaron Parkinson:
And I had a great conversation yesterday, and I'm sure you can give some insight on it, with a guy that wrote the book on gaining followers on social media. He consults huge brands and artists and musicians and all this stuff. And only this month did he have an upsell into a higher-priced product-

Jason Drohn:
Thing.

Aaron Parkinson:
... in his funnel. And it's not even correct. I went through it and went, "This is all wrong." This guy is spending $90,000 a month on paid ads and grossing $130,000. And I'm like, "Should be a million." Especially with the credibility, this guy has. And so in the info-marketing space, there's a very specific science to your upsells and your downsells in your model that make the whole thing profitable.

Jason Drohn:
Worth it. Right.

Aaron Parkinson:
And if you don't have them, you don't have a business. Which is why you don't see anybody out selling books, physical books. Or they just sell the book and then they go to a thank you page. And they're like, "Oh, thanks for buying my book." Because it would cost a hundred dollars to make a book sale. And they'd be underwater immediately.

Jason Drohn:
Well, even like the funnel factor textbook that I sent you. So I'm getting a proof next week. That book, the cost to print that book, is $24. Because it's full color, 274 pages, and it's a full 8.5 By 11. And so-

Aaron Parkinson:
And then?

Jason Drohn:
I don't know yet. It's going to be expensive.

Aaron Parkinson:
Let's call it $7. So your $30 cost, right?

Jason Drohn:
Good. Because it's not medium mail. Yeah.

Aaron Parkinson:
Right. Your $30 cost. And then there's the actual cost per acquisition of the marketing. And if you're going to charge... If we sell a book for free plus shipping, so just pay the shipping cost, $7, on a really good book it's going to cost us about $30 to make that sale.

Jason Drohn:
Yeah. Totally.

Aaron Parkinson:
So it cost us $30. Right. They paid $7. So we're in for $23. Then the actual book costs $24. Right. So $23 plus $24, we're in the hole $47.

Jason Drohn:
Yeah. And before breaking a sweat. Right? And then, yeah. Then thank you, confirmation.

Aaron Parkinson:
Yeah. Congratulations. You made a sale. We lost $47. Right. If you don't have that upsell path behind it, you can kiss your savings goodbye. You could go out and say, "Well, I'm going to become a bestseller. I'm going to sell a hundred thousand books in my first six months." Awesome. It's going to cost you $4.6 million.

Jason Drohn:
Which is how a lot of people do it. I'm sure you've met the professional New York Times bestselling people. And their guarantee is, "I will make you a best seller." It's going to cost a million dollars to do it. And $900,000 of that is buying your book.

Aaron Parkinson:
Right. It's insane. Or you could create a business model that made that whole thing profitable and become a best seller.

Jason Drohn:
Right. Right.

Aaron Parkinson:
I don't know which road you want to take.

Jason Drohn:
I'm thinking of the latter. Yeah.

Aaron Parkinson:
Yeah. Thinking the latter. And I'll wrap it up with this. When I was talking to this guy yesterday who I like a lot and is extremely successful, his skill set lies in the brand building awareness, social media, paid social media. But going viral, I just call it branding, right. It's a branding and awareness side of the business. And the reality is, is he wants to create a money machine to offset his consulting fees. Because consulting fees are very intensive. But with all of his marketing wizardry and knowledge, he doesn't know how to do direct response marketing.

Aaron Parkinson:
He doesn't know how to create the angle and the hook and the funnel and the ascension and the marketing automation tips and everything else to make it work. In the same way that I don't know how to run social media. I don't. It's not my jam. I know enough about it to be dangerous, but not good. Right. And he was sort of the same. He knew the terms and he knew the... But he didn't know the art side-

Jason Drohn:
Of it. Totally.

Aaron Parkinson:
... of it. Not enough time in the trenches. And my daughter, this morning I was talking to her about him and she was all excited because I dropped some big names that he's working with or whatever. And she's like, "Why does he need to hire you?"

Jason Drohn:
Right.

Aaron Parkinson:
And I had to explain to her the difference between branding and direct response and that one's not better than the other. They're like completely different planets. Even though you think they're the same thing because they're both-

Jason Drohn:
In the same ecosystem. Or the same galaxy.

Aaron Parkinson:
Yeah. But they're just not. One's like a bike and one's like a car. They're just different, so. What we talk a lot about on these calls is the direct response world, not the branding world. And the great thing is, is if you can get proof of concept with direct response marketing and prove that it will sell, then when you invest your money in the brand side of it, you win everything.

Jason Drohn:
Well, that's like Ezra and BOOM. That's what he did. He started, what four years ago, with direct response. Four or five now. And the brand is much bigger collectively than just the products that he started with.

Aaron Parkinson:
Yeah. I think they're going to do somewhere around $50 million in revenue this year. And I don't know what the valuation on a company like that would be, but I probably guess it's in the neighborhood of $600 million to $800 million.

Jason Drohn:
Something like that. Yeah.

Aaron Parkinson:
Right.

Jason Drohn:
Yeah.

Aaron Parkinson:
I think we can wrap it up though. I know you got visitors to your office.

Jason Drohn:
Yeah. Savan, come to say, "Hi". Come here. No, you're not going to say, "Hi?"

Aaron Parkinson:
No? Shy. It's because he doesn't have a Facebook shirt.

Jason Drohn:
Right. Exactly. All right, man. You have fun. Have a great weekend.

Aaron Parkinson:
Everybody enjoy your weekends.

Jason Drohn:
And next Friday, we'll have... I don't know. Figure out something else cool to talk about.

Aaron Parkinson:
Absolutely. All right. I'll talk to you soon.

Jason Drohn:
Later.

Aaron Parkinson:
Bye.

Savan:
Who was that?


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