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WORKSHOP TRANSCRIPT:

Speaker 1:
...are generally business owners, sometimes from age 40 to 70, and they're not necessarily known to shop. We're a higher-end kind of consulting firm. So as a trusted advisor, people aren't usually going on Facebook to say, "Who should I get for my DUI attorney?" or whatever. It's usually more reaching out, in closed email groups or whatever, so...

Jason Drohn:
What kind of clients? What vertical?

Speaker 1:
All verticals? Yeah, all verticals, from small to large to [crosstalk 00:00:00:34].

Jason Drohn:
Okay. Yeah. I mean, Facebook is our place. I mean, Google is another one. We're talking about Facebook today, but I pull out million-dollar B2B clients all over the country, every day, out of Facebook. So there's a market in here for you, if you wanted to pick up clients. Some of our biggest local play... We do ISM; Industrial Sales and Marketing or Industrial Sales and Manufacturing's marketing down on 12th Street and PSB's marketing. So I know that space well.

Speaker 1:
Yeah. I guess what I'm saying is, as a service provider, we're more like a law firm or an accounting firm.

Jason Drohn:
Oh right, right, a service partner.

Speaker 1:
We don't have a product and just through the nature of our work, it's a little different. I've spent thousands of dollars on paid Google ads and it's our market too. So people; we're a managed service provider. People don't even know what that is and they're not searching. So, there's been a lot of trial and error, from [geography. 00:01:39] I'm also part of a franchise. So we do some corporate stuff, but locally, our market is just different, being a third-tier market. We have franchises in New York, Denver, Chicago, San Francisco. So there are people there that are looking for what we do. So that's why I'm super interested in just learning a bit more.

Jason Drohn:
Cool.

Speaker 1:
Thanks.

Speaker 2:
So Beth McDonough, do you want to just... Jason knows who you are, but maybe just a quick who you are and what you do.

Beth:
Yeah, Jason, can't get rid of me. I'm like the neediest student-

Jason Drohn:
Good.

Beth:
I like my kids on homeschool. Mom.

Beth:
I am an interior decorator and a home stager, and I know my clients are looking for me on Facebook and Instagram and I'm looking to just massage out what exactly is the best idea for me in offers, passive income, that sort of thing. I'm just getting more ideas every day.

Speaker 2:
Thank you, Adrea.

Adrea:
Hi, my name's Adrea. I own Head Cases, a salon. Same thing. I know people are out there looking. Social media is [inaudible 00:03:00] for us because we can post, we're visual. So we have a decent presence, but yeah, as far as promoting, that's all new to me. Just this past year I started promoting and it's just kind of random. I have no understanding of what's the best way to promote, what should I be promoting? We tried to do the leads generation thing, that went terrible. So I'm just [inaudible 00:03:26] where to best spend my money.

Jason Drohn:
Cool.

Speaker 2:
There's a couple more here. I think Peggy might have her audio working now.

Jason Drohn:
Peggy says Owner of Bed and Breakfast.

Speaker 2:
Got it.

Peggy:
Yes. I did-

Speaker 2:
Oh, there she is.

Jason Drohn:
There she is.

Speaker 2:
And then Relish has joined. I don't think their audio is working, but Relish, I don't know if you know Jason, is a beach glass jeweler.

Jason Drohn:
Yep.

Speaker 2:
So, and Linda Stevenson is here and she's the big lady on top of Athena Erie. So she's a good person to know here. All right.

Jason Drohn:
Yeah. Fantastic. Well, we've got all kinds. We got some E-com physical products and we have some B2B managed services and we got some B2C... We've got all kinds. So that's cool. It's a good thing I prepared a little bit for this presentation. A tiny bit. So on a scale of one to 10, raise your hand if you have done anything with Facebook advertising, even boosted a post.

Jason Drohn:
Okay. We got three, four. Okay, cool. All right. Good. So I'm going to start basically from ground zero, and then talk about pages, what we call a business manager. On Facebook, a business manager is a collection of your assets inside Facebook. Then we're going to go through and talk about some of the ad campaigns that are working well and then we're going to set some stuff up. So I think it will probably work out pretty well that way. So let me share my screen.

Jason Drohn:
So you should be able to see my screen now, right?

Speaker 2:
Yes.

Jason Drohn:
Okay.

Speaker 2:
Yes.

Jason Drohn:
All right. So appropriately named Facebook Ads 101. Facebook is one of the absolute cheapest sources of traffic that you can get in front of, especially right now, it's more expensive than it used to be four or five years ago. But in the last couple of months, it has drastically reduced cost per click wise. It is just much, much cheaper than what it was, even a couple of months ago. Video is one of the reasons why, so if you can leverage a video in your ads... So it might be walking around video, it might be just a headshot video, where you are just talking to the camera or whatever, but if you can use a video in any way, then what Facebook will do is that it will track who watches how much of the video.

Jason Drohn:
It's a little bit creepy and a little bit random, I know, but you can actually build, you can put together pools of people, based on how much of a video somebody watches. So if you have... I did this with Industrial Sales and Manufacturing, they wanted to promote their career link job fair ad. So we did a little test of the $150. We've got 17,000 plays and then we went through and tracked how many people watched that ad. I think it was 1200 to 1300 people watched up until that point. Then from that, we were able to show them a different ad, just to apply for a job.

Jason Drohn:
So with video, you're able to build audiences on Facebook's back and live streams make it incredibly easy to do video. You can pull up the app, hit the record button and talk to your phone or your camera and you're streaming out to the rest of the world and everybody who's on your profile, who's on your page, who's in a group that you own or control, they're seeing your video. It works tremendously well because it is a tool that Facebook... Facebook wants to be the King of Video; they want to unseat YouTube. So what that means is that they make it easy to do live streams. It's easy to do video. It's also really cheap to advertise with video and I've been doing a morning live stream every single morning for the last... I think this morning was episode 44, so for the past two months. I just get on and talk for 20, 25 minutes and it has made a tremendous difference in our business.

Jason Drohn:
We've doubled in size in two months, just because we're doing these videos. I have a very... My target market is 55 to 64-year-old males. That too resonates with me, for whatever reason, and B2B owners typically owning companies that do a million dollars or more in revenue all over the country. They're resonating with the videos, ended up, their booking calls, and going down that rabbit hole.

Jason Drohn:
Then using custom with Facebook... So Facebook puts together, they have this functionality called custom audiences. What a custom audience is, is anybody who you tell Facebook is important. So it might be your customer list. If you have a customer list of 300 people, you can upload them to Facebook and say, these people are my buyers, go find me 2 million people who are just like them.

Jason Drohn:
Facebook knows, they collect 2000 data points about every human being they have. So they know who those people are, so they can put together 2 million potential customers for you that then you can advertise to. Now 2 million people are like the universe of people. So it will be like 2 million people in the United States. Well, if you're only targeting Pennsylvania, then you just layer that Pennsylvania filter over the top of it, and now all of a sudden you're targeting the people most likely to buy from you, just in Pennsylvania. That might be 150,000 people or something. We're going to talk a little bit more about audiences, once we get in and start building campaign.

Jason Drohn:
So there's a couple of things. The first is just this kind of understanding of what Facebook is. So Facebook has... Of course, they are... You have a profile with Facebook, so you have your profile and your profile has friends. So you have friends on Facebook and then they have your page, so a business page. Now a page has liked. So it's a really quick way of knowing the difference between the two, and the two are independent. So your profile can manage a page, but it doesn't have to. Now to have a page, you need to have a profile.

Jason Drohn:
Then there's this third entity, which is an ad account. So there's the profiles, the pages, and the ad accounts. You can have multiple ad accounts. So we have six or seven ad accounts. We have four or five pages. We have three or four groups, which is kind of a different style of page, but all of that is collected in what is known as a business manager.

Jason Drohn:
Inside a business manager, you can have your team, you can give your team access to a particular page, with certain roles or a particular ad account, or you can give users... If you're hiring an agency, an agency could have certain specialized access for that. So to learn more about what a business manager is if you go to... Facebook.com/business is kind of their business home. So I'm going to just throw this in the chatbox here. I might not be able to do it. Let's do it afterward and then...

Jason Drohn:
So facebook.com/business. Now from here, if you go to Learn, so this URL you'll probably need, but it is Your Guide For Setting Up a Facebook Business Manager. It's pretty simple. You set it up as your profile, but then what you have to do, and the pain in the ass is you have to collect your pages. So it takes a little bit of time, but basically, you go out and say, "This page is mine and this ad account is mine and this page is mine." You do it once, you put it in this business manager, and then it gives your business a home inside Facebook.

Jason Drohn:
Now, once you have that home created, then you can give access to other users, and then you can control ad spend a little bit more, and most importantly, you also get access to an ad rep.

Jason Drohn:
So an ad rep will call and say, "Hey, how's Facebook treating you, or we have this new feature available or blah, blah, blah," whatever. So it gives you a way to get a little bit of support, from Facebook directly. Of course, they're sales guys. So they're going to try to get you to spend more money but setting it up, you can set up new ad accounts from that business manager, you can set up a new page. You can add your team or an outside agency.

Jason Drohn:
Does everybody has a Facebook page? Okay. Everybody's got a page. All right, cool. So we're not going to talk about that. Does everybody know what a Facebook pixel is? No. Okay. So a Facebook pixel... Very, very, very, very, very, probably the most important thing about today's presentation is this Facebook pixel. So I'm going to show you how to find it, but the Facebook pixel is something that you should put on your website. It's one line of code, and you create the pixel and all the pixel does is every time somebody comes to your website, your website loads for them, then it sends that data back to Facebook and says, "Is this person also logged into Facebook?" And if they are, then they add them to a re-targeted list or a custom audience.

Jason Drohn:
So it ends up being... Let's say you have a hundred visitors today and 30 of them are logged into Facebook as well. Then you're able to show them and only them a particular ad. That particular ad is called the re-targeted ad. For Relish, it might be they went to your add to cart page on your website and did not buy. So now you can show an ad to say, "Hey, you forgot something in your shopping cart."

Jason Drohn:
Or if it is signing up for an appointment, let's say they're on the sales page, they're on the form where they would sign up for a call with one of your clients but they didn't register. Well, now we can show an ad, an ad can follow them around, saying, "Hey, you didn't book your appointment?"

Jason Drohn:
So super important is the Facebook pixel. I'll show you where to find it, but you want to make sure to install it on your entire website, site-wide. You also want to install it on any third-page software you're using, click funnels, lead pages. If you're using HubSpot pages or anything, Wix; wherever it is, you should, you should install this pixel.

Jason Drohn:
It's free and the worst-case scenario is you're never going to use that data. The best-case scenario is you decide you want to run Facebook ads in two months, and now you have a treasure trove of visitor information that you can then target your future buyers with. So more data is always better than no data.

Jason Drohn:
Custom conversions. So I'll show you where to set this up on Facebook too, but basically, what Facebook can do is you can set up what is known as conversion campaigns. So let's say your marketing, you want to get email leads onto your email list. So if you want email leads on your email list, you set up a conversion campaign. That conversion campaign fires every time a lead comes in.

Jason Drohn:
So basically, somebody comes in and they hit a Facebook ad, they come to your landing page. So they're on your landing page and they're deciding whether they want to opt-in or not. Now not everybody opts-in. Some people leave and they get bounced and then their kid runs in like my son, 17 million times a day, so they distract them and they leave. Well, there's a certain percentage of people who are going to opt-in. So they fill out the opt-in form and then they opt-in. Well, that's a confirmation page. So they fill in their email address. They get sent to another page, the confirmation page, or the thank you page, and what you do is on that page, you put a pixel that says, "This person is a successful conversion to me. This person is important to me."

Jason Drohn:
What Facebook does is they don't charge you for this person. They don't charge you for the clicks. They charge you for the conversion. So right now we have conversion campaigns running for my business that we don't pay for the traffic, we don't pay for the clicks. We only pay for the conversions and we're getting conversions at $4 apiece. So basically at this point, we're paying $4 for them, and then we are selling them stuff on the other side, and at this point, they're worth about $6 to us. So we're doubling our money. We're up 50% the second we get that conversion.

Jason Drohn:
So conversion campaigns are important to understand. You can use them for anything that is a landing page, confirmation page scenario. You can use them for Add to Carts. So somebody goes in, they fill up the shopping cart, that shopping cart on average, is worth $228, let's say. And then every time that final confirmation page fires, then you can let Facebook know this person was worth $228 to me. And then Facebook will charge whatever that conversion fee is.

Jason Drohn:
Another thing to think about is key content pages. So whether you know it or not, in your business, if you're doing business online, certain pages are more important than others. It might be a blog post, or it might be an advertorial. We call them advertorials. But we call them a key content page basically, and it's a blog post that you're getting a bunch of traffic to. Sometimes you don't even know that you're going a bunch of traffic unless you know your data, your analytics. You might be getting 30, 40 visitors a day and that particular blog post is sending four or five sales. But in the scheme of things, you can't see it because you're well, "I know I'm getting four or five sales, but I don't know where they're coming from."

Jason Drohn:
But in all actuality, it's a blog post. There's this little subset of traffic and they're coming in, they're hitting a blog post, then they're hitting your sales page and they're buying. Well, the blog post, what it's doing is it's pre-framing your customer to purchase. So it's like a psychological sales, as a psychological thing, but it's putting your prospect in the right frame of mind to buy the thing that you are selling, in a way that the rest of the pages on your website are not doing. So when that happens, the key to scaling that business is driving more traffic to that page, not the rest of them, that page. Then when you drive traffic to that page, your conversions scale, and you are seeing... It's the 80/20 rule played out, in modern-day website conversion.

Jason Drohn:
So I probably got too deep on that, but I like finding those anomalies because those anomalies, you can then exploit, you can run more traffic to, and you can make a bunch more money from a website.

Jason Drohn:
Another one. So groups; like pages, Facebook groups are additional ways that you can engage with your audience and you can pull data out. If you have 2 or 300 or 400 people in a Facebook group, you can pull that data and say, "Go find me 2 million people just like them." Some interesting things about Facebook groups though. A lot of people sell Facebook groups monthly. It's a value add or a bonus to an offer. So if you have... For a lot of our clients, they'll sell an upsell that is $97 for Facebook group access and they get custom coaching and support and all that other stuff.

Jason Drohn:
The new trend that has emerged in the last six months or so are people using Facebook groups as a way to corral all of their members, and then they're doing what is called a Bootcamp. I've seen it work in B2B spaces, in really, really consumer-grade spaces, in health and fitness and sales and leadership and life coaching and all... But anyway, so what they do is they basically promote this group for 30 days and they get a couple of hundred people in this group, and then they run a five-day Bootcamp. The five days Bootcamp is... It's five, 15-minute videos going; back to the video being important. So it's five, 15-minute videos, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. So they build up this group for 30 days. They run the five boot camp videos, and then it's all free content, free value, free, free, free; it's free up until Thursday in this little scenario.

Jason Drohn:
So day four, they close, with something that says, "Hey, tomorrow's the last day we're going to be doing this Bootcamp. So I'm excited. I'm going to reveal the project that we've been working on." Then on day five, they go in and the pitch is "Sign up for a call with me. Sign up for a sales call," or "Click the button below to order," or whatever. But the fifth day is where they make the pitch, for whatever program they're selling.

Jason Drohn:
We have run this with pivoting businesses, where they're pivoting out of B2B and into groups or this digital ecosystem. The first time they run it, they ended up doing $80,000 a month in sales recurring. We ran it with a client who just did $4.2 million. It's a B2B group on acquiring other businesses. They ran it, the first time it's $4.2 million, and then they're doing it again... So that was a month ago. They're doing it again. And they're already up to $11.1 million. They have 1400 members in a group.

Jason Drohn:
It's the same; literally, that is the process. They collect people into a group, they run the five boot camps or the five sessions, and then they support the members through there. And then they open the offer for two weeks. So it's five sessions, open offer for two weeks, and then they're doing all the sales calls and stuff in there. Then they're starting... It would be June 1st is when they would be starting.

Jason Drohn:
So it's an interesting way to use groups. There's a whole weird moneymaking ecosystem inside Facebook which you would have never guessed. It's crazy.

Jason Drohn:
Managing pages. You can manage your Facebook page or group however you'd like. So I use a tool called Hootsuite H O O T S U I T E for social media management. It's the best $49 that I spend. Well, probably. It's a pretty good spend of $49. But basically what it does is it lets you post whatever you want to any of your social media profiles. My process is, because I'm busy, as we all are... So what I do is I read for 15 to 20 minutes in the morning. News, I'll just skim through Apple News and it's less now than it was a month ago because I can't put up with all the random garbage that is there. So I'm just big swipes, you know what I mean? What I do is I'll read Apple News and then whenever I find a business-y kind of post that I think my audience is going to like, I will just hit Hootsuite and then share it to all the groups that I think it's going to like and then hit auto-submit and it actually schedules it on autopilot.

Jason Drohn:
So I spend 15 minutes curating the entire day's worth of posts, and it's all because I'm just reading it anyway. So it's a nice little social media management tool. Anymore, you don't get Facebook mentions or shares or likes or anything for free. They have limited the engagement of the people who like your page to almost nothing. So it doesn't even make sense to really build likes. The groups make sense because you can engage with them, in a very warm, friendly way, but everything else you're going to be looking at ads.

Jason Drohn:
Does anybody have any questions? We're going to jump into Facebook and actually set up ads and all that other stuff. But I think there are questions maybe?

Speaker 2:
Just so you guys know you might be muted, so you'll have to unmute yourself if you have a question.

Speaker 2:
No questions, I guess not.

Jason Drohn:
Wow. I know I didn't do that good of a job. I know I didn't do-

Adria:
I guess not.

Jason:
Wow, I know I didn't do that good of a job. I know I didn't do that. Sorry. All right.

Adria:
...whelming.

Speaker 3:
What, Adria?

Adria:
I just said it's overwhelming. I guess I don't know what questions to ask because it's a lot.

Jason:
It is a lot.

Speaker 3:
Yeah. I think maybe, Jason, would it be helpful to talk about different ways to use the groups, just a little bit maybe, for someone like Adria, who has a hair salon? What do you suggest for someone like her? She is not going to sell a Bootcamp.

Jason:
No, she is not. I have a social media influencer client who does, she is in the UK, who does aesthetics. She has 230,000 Instagram followers for aesthetics. She sells a tremendous number of videos that are just how to do different things, to other people in her space, to the tune of ... She doesn't even know what she is doing, and she is doing $80,000 a month in digital sales.

Jason:
In terms of groups or in terms of building a following or anything, any of that kind of stuff would be super, super helpful. You can always do little 15-second videos, which will help build a following, or groups. You can put together groups of other salon owners and then you can sell them stuff.

Jason:
It's a B2B play, but it helps you transition and pivot out of what we're doing right now. The B2C play, where you're actually getting people into your salon, then it's a Google ad words campaign and maybe you can generate email lists from a discount code or something.

Adria:
Okay. I already have a lot of those types of videos available on my social media. What would I do specifically? I have them on my Instagram. You have that separate area where you can put all your videos. What do you do with them? Once you already have them, then what are you doing with them?

Jason:
Well, if you're going to go off to other salon owners, then I would definitely set up a group and invite other salon owners, people you meet in groups or associations or whatever. Then you become their influencer if you will. You become their expert or the coach of the coaches and the users, your people who are coming into the salon.

Jason:
If it's me, I'm running discount codes or I'm running paid traffic campaigns with discount codes or something like that, like Google my business kind of stuff. Some of them, might see that stuff on Facebook and then book a call, but everything we do is a very direct response. They hit the ad and then on Facebook, you can do what is called Facebook lead ads. They hit the ad and then it auto-populates their name and number. Then they hit submit and then you get the information, well, which is great, but then you also have to act on it too.

Jason:
You can send it in to a CRM and start running emails from it. You can call them on the phone, which doesn't make sense, really. It's what you do with it after you get the lead. Getting the lead is pretty easy. I actually just ... Oh, you want to see something cool? I just tested this out. I just saw it this morning, getemail.com.

Jason:
This is not geek emails. It's got email. Getemails.com is ... I think they are based in Texas. It's a little script you install on your website and they actually identify, they match the people who are coming to your website with email addresses. It's 100% legal. They opted in to a different source to get the emails.

Jason:
Just based on your website traffic, you are able to acquire the emails, and then you are able to market to them. It has integrations with CRM. It's pretty cool stuff. I ran it. I put it on my site this morning at 4:30 AM. I had already gotten 25 leads by today.

Speaker 3:
Yeah, so Jason [crosstalk 00:30:49] ...

Adria:
Go ahead.

Speaker 3:
Go ahead. Go ahead, Adria.

Adria:
We ran a campaign in the fall. The issue was being able to be efficient with the leads that we got. It was really hard to access them. Number one, there was no way of finding who they were coming from and then being able to access them in an efficient way, throughout your busy day. Does that make sense?

Adria:
What did you recommend [crosstalk 00:31:10] ...

Jason:
Facebook lead ads?

Adria:
Yeah. What is the best way to manage that because we didn't manage it correctly at all? I really felt like that was a total fail on our part.

Jason:
Yeah, so how you do it as you set up a ... Are you familiar with Zapier? Zapier is a piece of software that connects to other pieces of software. It's an API integration software.

Adria:
Okay.

Jason:
What you do is you set it up so Facebook sends your leads to Zapier and then Zapier puts them on a spreadsheet or Zapier adds them directly into your CRM. Then the emails start firing from there, so it can be totally hands-off. It can be a handoff process for you. Then this person is just being marketed to until they come into the salon.

Adria:
Is that a free service?

Jason:
Yeah. I don't remember if Facebook's integration is free. It might be 20 bucks a month. I can't remember.

Adria:
The basic leads will go directly to that.

Jason:
Yeah. Well, Zapier just connects to two things. Basically you set it up so Facebook sends ... You can have Facebook connect up to a Google spreadsheet, so all your Facebook leads are being added to Google spreadsheets.

Jason:
You can have them send you an email with all of those leads. You can send them to Facebook or send them to a Salesfloor or whatever. The easiest way is just to set it up like Facebook to Mailchimp and Mailchimp runs the email sequence in the background, and then you end up getting [crosstalk 00:32:46].

Adria:
Yeah. Okay.

Jason:
It was all triggered through Zapier. Zapier is the glue that pulls the two things together.

Adria:
Okay. That was our issue, too. Yeah, for sure. Thank you.

Jason:
Yeah.

Speaker 3:
Adria, and everyone actually, I think the one takeaway, too, other than just that kind of thing is you want to be able to know who is seeing your stuff. The groups, just in general, will provide a smaller test group for yourself, or even give you the lowest hanging fruit versus you just doing it on your regular page.

Jason:
Yeah.

Speaker 3:
Does that make sense?

Jason:
Yeah. It gives you an in. It's really easy to get lost with stuff on Pages. That is why people like the groups because it's easier to have ... Right now people are just craving meaningful connections. Literally, it's why we are on a video call right now.

Jason:
Three months ago, we would have been on a conference call or something and video wouldn't be being shared en masse as it has been. People are just craving connection, so groups help. They are a way to facilitate that connection and people are just using them to sell services and sell stuff, too.

Jason:
All right. Questions? You want to kick in and create some ads or what?

Jason:
Yep? Okay.

Adria:
Yeah.

Jason:
All right. My favorite-ist tool in the whole world is a piece of software called Canva. And you guys familiar with Canva? All right.

Adria:
Yes.

Jason:
This is my big takeaway number two for you today. Canva is really, really nice stuff. I don't think this is ... Is this my ...? I can't remember. Anyway, so Canva, they have a free plan and then they have other plans, but you can get pretty far with just the free one.

Jason:
Basically, if you want to create a Facebook ad, you just go in here and you type in Facebook and ad. It has all kinds of pre-made, really nice-looking, really well-converting stuff. You can just find something you like. I have used this one before. This is "IT Tech Services. Call us for help." That's it.

Jason:
Then you can go through and drag your ... I have got all kinds of uploads and stuff in here, but we're going to look for a photo. We're going to look for networking. Some of the MSPs like their bread and butter. Not quite networking, but we will do this one. There you go.

Jason:
Now, if we want to put a little filter on this thing, this is one of my favorites right here. Then we can make this guy big. With Facebook ads, your text needs to be less than 20%. It's an old rule. It still applies, but your text needs to be less than 20%. This font doesn't work really well. Maybe we would like that one, so IT Tech Service, the thing really stands out.

Jason:
What you can do is you can download this guy. We're just going to download it to our desktop and then we're going to go create an ad with it. That is going to be our Facebook ad.

Jason:
Now, we're going to pull up our ad manager. This is my business manager, well, one of them. You can go in and you'll have different ad accounts and you'll have your pages and all that stuff. Then my employees are in here and they all have access to different ad accounts and stuff.

Jason:
We're going to go, then, and create a new ad. I'm just walking through the creation process and you can stop me whenever. The campaign name, how I set these up is I always think about where in the life cycle our traffic is. Are they cold? Are they warm? Do they know who we are? Do they not?

Jason:
If they are cold means they don't know who I am. They have never seen an ad. They don't even sometimes know that they actually want the thing that we provide yet. I always label it that way, so I can just look and say, "Okay." You can actually see it here. I have like funnel factor, warm funnel factor, cold funnel factor, warm. I label them that way so that I can know, just by glancing, here's my cold traffic campaign. I'm going to spend 200 bucks a day. On my warm traffic campaign, I spent 30 bucks a day, so that I know that my pipeline is full. I'm spending a bunch of money on the front side and then it's full.

Jason:
Then we can also track conversions as well. This campaign is going to be a cold traffic campaign for IT Managed Service Providers in the Chicago area. The buying type is going to be an auction. It's always auction.

Jason:
Now there are different campaign objectives. There are three that we use all the time. Traffic is one, so we're sending traffic to a page on our website. We always start campaigns with traffic. Always start with traffic because Facebook has no idea who you're targeting, so we can't go directly to conversions just yet. Facebook doesn't ... They are not wizards, so we always start with traffic.

Jason:
Then what we do is we build up some conversion data. We give Facebook an idea of who we are looking for. Then we turn this traffic campaign into this conversion campaign. It's down here for conversions, and that is when we're paying for conversions. You can actually see here if we go into this ad account or this right here, this is a cold traffic ad.

Jason:
Right now, this is in the last 14 days for this particular ad. You can see that my average lead cost per lead is $4.94. Now in this campaign, it is $8.46. In this campaign, it is $9.51.

Jason:
Then we have optimized this campaign. If we look at just, let's say, the last ... We're going to look at the 11th through the 13th and just update this. Our lead costs now, $3.42, $7.56, $6.47, so we have cut a couple of bucks out per lead in the last couple of days. Then today $1.24, $5.19, $2.75, $4.61, $4.83, $4.00, because we continue optimizing the campaign so that the ad cost gets better and better and better.

Jason:
Now, the crazy thing is ... Well, I'll save that, but basically we're just letting Facebook show this to whoever the hell it wants right now. There is no interest targeting. I have zero demographic data in these campaigns. We're just letting Facebook's AI do the work.

Jason:
Okay, so in setting up the campaigns, we have traffic, conversions and then we have lead generation. The lead generation is those lead ads. We don't use lead ads a whole lot, mostly because it is what Adria said. They are a pain in the ass to track, and then they trigger certain things and they do certain things and they're weird. They're just weird, so we don't really do a whole lot of them.

Jason:
We do a lot of video views campaigns, though. What a video views campaign is, is you're paying per view. It's usually a cent or two cents per view, and especially, if you're targeting URI, you can get in front of almost everybody in URI on 150 bucks. Alaska, I'm sure, you're going to be able to get in front of almost everybody on 200 bucks. They're going to all know who you are.

Jason:
I have one realtor that we're running in traffic for on URI. He is smoking it. Steve Szumigale. Does anybody know Steve? No? Yeah?

Adria:
Um-hmm (affirmative.)

Jason:
He is just crushing it right now, and it's just little tiny campaigns, spends 50 bucks a day. His video is a little bit quirky. I didn't quite expect it to turn out like that when I wrote the script for him, but when you see it, you'll laugh.

Jason:
Video views campaigns, we do quite a lot of. The rest of this stuff, we don't. We don't do Page likes. We don't do Messages. We don't do brand awareness or Reach because what brand awareness or Reach is going to do is it's just going to show your ad as many times as it possibly, possibly can. It does not care if anybody clicks. It doesn't care if somebody visits the landing page or clicks through or converts or signs up or whatever.

Jason:
It's just going to spend money as quickly as possible, which blows my mind because how can just a little tiny checkbox here influence the ad so much? This ad will give you no sales, no sales, no leads, same creative, same everything else, whereas this ad will give you sales and leads and this ad will give you a lot of sales and leads and conversions, once you have enough data.

Jason:
We're doing cold traffic-

Speaker 4:
Quick question. Sorry. Can we go back to the types, when you were talking about switching to the conversion? How do you know when you have enough data to switch from a traffic campaign to a conversion campaign?

Jason:
That's a great question. The answer is 50 in a week.

Speaker 4:
50 in a week.

Jason:
Yep, so that's why we always start with email leads first. Then from email leads, we go to product purchases. If you're somebody like Relish. Relish, I think that is eCommerce, right? Is Relish eCommerce? Does anybody do stuff with Relish? I don't know. I don't think she has a mic, but maybe she can type it in. Are you muted?

Speaker 5:
Yes, we do have eCommerce.

Jason:
Okay, so how many orders do you get online every week?

Speaker 5:
Oh, now in the COVID, I'm up to but probably averaging the last month, maybe ten or 15.

Jason:
Okay, so you could probably, after a couple of weeks of data, you could probably run in conversion campaign and then only pay per sale. You're getting those conversions already, but typically, we do a very low barrier of entry-like conversion campaign, like a lead magnet. They download a report or something or discount code or whatever and then we can leverage the conversions up.

Jason:
I think Relish is doing enough sales that they could probably do it within a couple of weeks. They could switch over to a conversion or anybody who's doing 20, 30 orders within a week or a couple of week period, but the magic number is 50.

Jason:
A lot of times, I will convert it at about 20 because as soon as you convert to a conversion campaign, you're going to save about 40% off of the traffic cost, because Facebook, which sounds weird because Facebook rewards you for switching to a conversion campaign is cheaper traffic. Of course, Facebook wants to sell more traffic, but here's the thing about conversion campaigns. Facebook can actually show that ad to fewer people because Facebook knows who is going to convert in their magical way.

Jason:
They have more ad inventory to sell to somebody else when your ad isn't in front of that person. That is why they reward you for showing your ad to fewer people in switching to a conversion campaign. It's weird.

Speaker 4:
Sorry, one more thing. When you switch from traffic to conversion, can it just be 50 email addresses in a week or do you have to be selling a product?

Jason:
No, it can be 50 emails. It can be 50-page loads.

Speaker 4:
Okay, so once you have 50 views or 50 anything, then you can switch.

Jason:
That's right.

Speaker 4:
Okay.

Jason:
Yep. Yeah, remember I was talking about that key content page like it does a blog post? If a blog post is important to the overall sales process, that can be a conversion. When somebody hits that page, it fires a conversion and then Facebook starts tracking it. Okay, cool.

Jason:
Now the outset, so how Facebook is broken out, everything starts as a campaign. It goes campaign first and then ad sets and then ads. The campaign is the umbrella and then the ad set is where all of your targetings happens, your age groups, your male, female, and your demographics and what they like and what they don't like and all that stuff. Then your ad is the actual creative inside that ad.

Jason:
We're just going to let them ... Our campaign name is going to be cold IDT, MSP providers, Chicago. Then the ad set, I'm just going to say male 35 to 54, Chicago. Then the ad name is going to be an image ad. Then I usually have a version ID, just because we test a lot of different versions, so version one, version two, version 1.1.

Jason:
All right, so now we are inside the campaign and we are going to start setting up the ad. This first screen, this campaign set-up screen, we have already done most of it. This isn't an auction ad. We are setting up a traffic campaign. Then we're using what is called campaign budget optimization. What that means is you assign one budget for the entire campaign, and then it spreads that budget out amongst all of the campaigns, at its discretion.

Jason:
If you have one ad set that is working, but then the rest, it will put money in that thing. You can offset that. This campaign set up is pretty good.

Jason:
Then what we do is we go to the ad set, which is the next nested coming down number or menu, I should say, and we have our ad set name: male, 35 to 54, Chicago. Now the ad set name can be whatever you want. I typically have these naming conventions so I can, again, look at the ad real quick and say, "Oh, that's my male, 35 to 54. They're converting four times higher than everybody else," so I know who they are without having to like go into the ad.

Jason:
We're driving traffic to a website. You can drive traffic to lots of places. You can go to an app, you can go-to messenger, but most everybody is going to be to a website. This dynamic creative is super, super important. It's a new feature and basically what this does is Facebook will let you upload a couple of different headlines, a couple of different ads, and then it's going to test those things for you. It's the easiest way of setting up a really nice ad, a really great ad that converts.

Jason:
We're just going to hit this one and then this says ... We're going to set it up at the ad level, so we're just going to click that on. Now, we're going to start today at 3:54 PM and then we're going to create ... I was talking about all the pixel audiences when we were doing the PowerPoint presentation. That is where this is going to be set up.

Jason:
If you have an audience of, in this case, it's going to be IT MSD, managed service providers, so you would select it here. I don't have a list of IT MSPs. I do have lots of other audiences, so we're just going go through these.

Jason:
I have an audience that is everybody who has been to my website in the last 30 days. I have another audience of, let's see, everybody who has watched one of my videos ten seconds or more. There are 6,000 people in that audience. I'm going to select that one and now I'm only going to be showing ads to the people who have watched ten seconds or more of my video.

Jason:
Likewise, the next tab over is these lookalike audiences. A lookalike audience is one percent of the US population who is exactly like my best buyers. Here is a little digital course that I have. What I'm doing here is I told Facebook, here are my buyers, here are my customers. Show me 2.1 million people, and you can see it right there. There is 2.1 million people in this audience.

Jason:
Show me 2.1 million people just like my buyers and let me advertise directly to them. We can select that. Now we're advertising to those 2.1 million people with our ad. Now that we have this great big, huge audience, we have 2.2 million people that we're going to be advertising to, now we have got to start chopping that thing down.

Jason:
We can't advertise to two million people. We can, but if you're not spending $50,000 day, you're not going to get in front of hardly any of them, so we're going-

Speaker 6:
So we're going to... Let's say we're advertising to just, well we're advertising to Chicago. I already put it in the app. So we are just going to Chicago. Now, Chicago, Illinois. Now, we can advertise in Chicago. We can advertise to the surrounding areas of Chicago. So we can go up to 50 miles around Chicago, so it ends up encompassing Joliet and Aurora and Elgin. We can also go down to a mile. We can go down to 10 miles, so the 10-mile area.

Speaker 6:
It used to be... All right so it still does it. If you type an address, you can go down to one mile. So this is my house. I could actually target my neighborhood with an ad right now if I wanted. Now, I know it sounds weird, but think about the industry conventions that all meet in one or two places a year for a conference. So can you target all of them? Absolutely. You can target a conference center, you can target a hotel... And there's plenty of ways that you can use that. So you can target them, they come to your website, and now you have that audience data forever. So you can do retargeting and stuff.

Speaker 6:
I did it for photography... So I have a photography client who works with other photographers and we did it for one of his events. So there were 15,000 people at a sync convention. I get confused because I'm not a photographer. So we blanketed that hotel with an ad. He had a lunch and learn, and we filled up his space with it. And it was just one ad. The ad showed up on Facebook. Every time somebody went to Facebook in that building, the ad showed up.

Speaker 6:
Now, this particular one, we're doing Chicago, and then we're targeting 35 to 54, male. So we're doing 35. So one of the reasons I picked 35, it's really hard to find buyers below the age of 35 on Facebook. Most people below the age of 35 don't buy online. So they do, but they don't buy the stuff that we want to sell, they would rather figure it out on their own. They do buy physical products, and if they buy, they tend to buy on Instagram, which Facebook... You can actually target Instagram. We're going to cover that, but it's really important to segment out the younger people because they might not buy. Gender is going to be men.

Speaker 7:
I have a question, sorry. I'm not sure if it's easier to ask it now or later.

Speaker 6:
No, go ahead.

Speaker 7:
Let me ask it now, is you have this lovely dropdown of all these audiences to select from. For those of us who have not done any of it, how do you start? We wouldn't have a dropdown menu.

Speaker 6:
No. Once we get done with this ad, we'll go over and set up a couple of audiences.

Speaker 7:
Okay. Thank you.

Speaker 6:
Yeah. Yup. A lovely dropdown, yeah. Really, the audience data is what makes this so powerful. That's the important part. All right. So detailed targeting. So if we're looking, let's see, ITMSPs, so we're going to be really, really generic with this and we're just going to say, business owners. So there is a category of business owners that Facebook gives you access to. So small business owner's behaviors, and small business owner's interests. So these are people who like small business, they like things related to the small business owners. They're also a Facebook page admin. So there's a couple of different ways that Facebook identifies that you own a business. So you can target them. So now we're targeting four million business owners.

Speaker 6:
You can also target associations. Business, associations, national business, aviation associations, small business owners. And then you can just hit suggestions, and then there are lots of dropdowns here. Let's see. Relish, who are some of your competitors? Would you say. Maybe they muted us.

Speaker 8:
[inaudible 00:57:05] in Hawaii.

Speaker 6:
What was that? I'm sorry. Yeah. There's home, there's Pandora costume. Nothing for beach spots.

Speaker 8:
Hey, Jason, can you hear us?

Speaker 6:
I can hear you, yeah.

Speaker 8:
Okay. So it was called Sea & Sky Studio.

Speaker 6:
Sea & Sky Studio. Let's see if they're in here. That's not finding that. A lot of times Facebook pages that have big followings will be in here, but sometimes they don't. I don't know how you can opt-out of it, but sometimes they don't.

Speaker 9:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Speaker 6:
Yeah. Then let's see.

Speaker 9:
[inaudible 00:58:09]

Speaker 6:
Here, so why don't you put your targeting in, and we're just going to do business owners for now. Business owners there, and then once you add your targeting in... And how I like to think about targeting is, I always try to find buyers. So if a small business owner is most likely going to be spending money on QuickBooks or spending money on HubSpot, like CRM, or spending money on some sort of an accounting tool. They're going to have a magazine subscription for Fortune magazine or... So I always try to find... So you can have Fortune magazine or QuickBooks as interests, and then you can actually narrow these down. So you can narrow the audience and say this person needs to like either QuickBooks and small business owners. And then they also have to like HubSpot.

Speaker 6:
So HubSpot is a big CRM. It's a publicly-traded company. So 5.2 million people like HubSpot. So now you're layering in these selects, that make this a really, really hyperactive business owner. And every market has... You can layer in these additional things. Now underneath placements. So we're kind of good here. You don't need any of this stuff. You can save the audience and actually create your first code traffic audience if you want. But this part is really important. So what you're doing here is selecting your placements and you're telling Facebook where you want to advertise? Now, if you give Facebook the option, especially when you're stone-cold new, first ads you've done. Facebook is going to put you all over the place. And they're probably going to put you in places that you don't really want to be. One of them being this audience network.

Speaker 6:
So right here, whenever we're starting from scratch, we always unselect that audience network it's like garbage traffic. So if you're... Like my son will download a game out of the app store, and he's clicking through ads there he's playing games and then an ad comes up and he clicks and he comes over and he's giving me the iPad to approve a $50 transaction from the app store or whatever. And it's like, "Ah, no." Well, that is like an audience network ad. So it's crap traffic it's from games and other websites that they have nothing to do with what it is you're trying to actually do. But it's a way for the app developers to monetize money, to monetize their games, and it's a way for Facebook to continue putting ads places. Because Facebook is running out of inventory. Or they were, but now advertisers are holding up.

Speaker 6:
So we always select Facebook and Instagram. Now for Relish, Instagram's going to be super, super important now. But Instagram would be good for bed and breakfast too. MSPs not so much. Those folks are in Facebook. And then I always... So I usually try when I'm first starting and I try to separate mobile and desktop. Because certain people would just prefer different... The younger generation does mobile. Everybody does everything on mobile. We can not show our ad on mobile. In fact, a lot of our ads when we're first starting just are only solely on desktop because I know that my customer is on a desktop. They come to work, they sit at their desk, they have a keyboard, they're plugged in and they're here for a couple of hours.

Speaker 6:
And when they're on Facebook and on a desktop, they're engaged with a screen. Not so much with mobile, for our customers. Now once Facebook's version information, conversion data, it's good, then you can open it up and it will find your people also on mobile and you'll get buyers from there. But starting off, just go Facebook and Instagram, no audience network and then if you have an older clientele, just do desktop, if you have a younger clientele do mobile, but make sure your website is mobile optimized. And these are all the places that the ads serve. And then just leave your optimization for link clicks, for now. All right. Any questions here?

Speaker 6:
[inaudible 01:03:10].

Speaker 10:
[inaudible 00:11:15].

Speaker 6:
Okay.

Speaker 10:
Can you hear me okay?

Speaker 6:
Yeah. I can hear you good now.

Speaker 10:
Regarding audience, we have a form on our website that says, "Would you like to be a part of our newsletter?" And it pops up and they put their email address. Web API it over to MailChimp.

Speaker 6:
Okay.

Speaker 10:
And I have loaded that to Facebook before. So I've been through a lot of this playing around process. I certainly don't claim to be an expert by any stretch, but I noticed massive differences in this form now to two years ago.

Speaker 6:
So much, yeah.

Speaker 10:
I gave up two years ago and said, "This is really awful." But what I see right now is really cool. And then I own a software business and I used it for my software business and I said, "I want all chiropractors in the state of Pennsylvania to get my ad." Two years ago I didn't get a single chiropractor, but you got people that love chiropractic. No buyers, but people that were just generally interested in it. So I gave up there too. The targeting was just awful. I couldn't get to a real buyer. So, that's changed.

Speaker 6:
Yeah we get to buyers all the time. The important part is the marketing message and then getting them to do something, like signing up for a lead magnet. So basically no matter... For your software business, it's getting them to raise their hand and say, "Yes, I want more information, yes I want this problem solved for me."

Speaker 6:
From a consumer goods standpoint, it is getting them in and engaged in a website, looking at pictures and then ultimately going to an ad card. And then what you do... So your list for Relish, you upload it to Facebook and you create a lookalike audience, which I'll show you how to do after this.

Speaker 10:
Okay.

Speaker 6:
And then from your software side, you need a way for them to raise their hand and say, they want more information basically. I have six software businesses. So I know the software side really well. We do lead magnet into free trial, typically, 14-day free trial. And then we'll sell like $197 a month after that. You can do the one-off kind of big-ticket close, but then it's like you have to close it on a sales call, which might make sense and it might not. It really just depends. But for all intents and purposes your chiropractic targeting is going to be that narrow thing.

Speaker 6:
So you're going to target countrywide. I would still have QuickBooks in here because QuickBooks, if they like QuickBooks, if they like, not Photoshop... FreshBooks, FreshBooks has 300,000 people. If they like HubSpot. Then they like some tools that they're paying for. And then they are also, and must also match... So chiropractor. So you can do a job title of chiropractor or a better way to do it, is you target the chiropractor associations. So these people, and then you just let them... So chiropractor owner, doctor of chiropractic, New York chiropractic college, Homer. So you go through this list and target people who... They haven't identified that they like chiropractic, but they have identified that they like something that a layperson about chiropractic wouldn't know. Does that make sense?

Speaker 10:
Yeah this is way better than two years.

Speaker 6:
Oh yeah, super better. Yeah, super better.

Speaker 10:
A lot better.

Speaker 6:
My son he's five. Yeah, no problem. Cool. Any other questions with the targeting piece? No? Okay. All right, now the ad. So the ad set up is really very easy compared... And so the audience set up is, is the biggest pain, but the ad is, you give it the Facebook page you want to target. So in this case, I'm targeting Done For You. You can select the Facebook or an Instagram account, and then you just tell it what you have, what kind of creative assets you have. So I have a single image video or in a carousel. This is the ad that we just set up. So we have a single image or video, and then we're going to select the images and then I'm going to upload that thing. So we're just going to upload it into the ad account and weird, oddly enough... Can I, I don't know if I can make this bigger. This ad right here is absolutely crushing it for us right now. So I'm going to add them both. So this side. Right here.

Speaker 6:
Oh in fact I'll let us do it right now. But this ad is basically my son just working on two different computers, side by side. It's doubling the conversions of everything else we got right now, it's weird. All right so we selected an ad. Now this is a dynamic creative piece. So basically what's going to happen is it's going to switch out some different ad creatives and different images, and then it's going to switch out different headlines and different ad text. So we're just going to go through and set it up. So our primary text is the text that shows up above the ad image. So I always start with a question. So when you scale ads asking... So Facebook really, really doesn't like it when you make somebody feel bad about themselves. If there's ever a disapproval for an ad, that's one of the reasons why. They feel that everybody needs to be positively reinforced if they are in Facebook, to put it simply.

Speaker 6:
So you can't ask a straight-up question like, "Do you feel overwhelmed? Do you want to lose weight? Are your kids bugging you like crazy?" Whenever there's a you it's always a gray area, so you need to like tread lightly. What you can do and how they advise you to do it, is to talk about your service or talk about the thing you're doing, So I offer some sort of service that helps with whatever. And then you can actually... And you can run ads with lines in it. It actually works pretty well. Or I help X with Y or whatever. And then you can add another variation.

Speaker 6:
So what's going to happen is, every time Facebook services that, it's going to serve the same image and pick a different headline. Which is going to give your ad different looks. People are going to be looking at it differently and multiple times and it's going to attract and engage their audience. And that they're going to have different looks at you. So you're going to constantly reinforce your brand in their mind by doing this. It's actually really, really cool. Then our headline it's going to be down below. So I actually need to put a website URL in here so you can see the ad preview.

Speaker 6:
Okay. There we go. So IT Tech Services. I help with... The headline is going to be... So one of the things I like to do is I like to use Facebook emojis. So if you go to Google and type Facebook emojis... Emojis are just another way that grabs somebody's attention when they're looking at ads and the best performing ads use them, typically. So we're going to use this little [inaudible 00:19:35]. Can we use that little devil face, maybe. So I just right click and hit copy. Let me see if it'll... Will it let me paste it? Nope. No, it didn't. Sometimes these tools, don't make it real easy. So we're going to go back when it is free. There it is, Facebook emoji list. There we go.

Speaker 6:
So we're going to look for animals and nature. We're going to a dog's face. Aww. It might not let me. I'll just highlight this guy, this little teddy bear. So you just highlight it and then you should be able to right-click, hit paste. Yep, there it is. So there's our little teddy bear. So now we have a teddy bear in our title line, which is enough of... It's a pattern interrupt. So it engages people as they're scrolling through a little bit differently. It's a little bit different of an ad. So now we have this blank line and the teddy bear and people are like, "Who are these people?" So headline can be, "Download my free white paper," if this is an ITMSP ad. Then we're looking for a description. Most of the meat of the ad is going to be above the image.

Speaker 6:
So for the description, I usually just reinforce the call to action, which is, click here to download a free report that will help you save lots of money, or whatever. Display Link, we don't need that, call to action. This is a really great thing to test. Learn more is a great call to action. Oftentimes you get a bump if you use some of these other different ones. So you might use subscribe or watch more is a good one. I don't think you can not use. Can you not use one now? I used to pull the button out a lot and I would actually get some pretty good results just from having no button.

Speaker 6:
All right, so there's our ad. All right done. So we're going to look at the variations now. So I'm actually going to go add this image of my son. I'm going to select images and I'm going to add this one just so you can see what a different image looks like. So it adds in there. And then we're going to view variations. So we have, I offer blank service. And then the next variation is, I help with, I help with, and the next variation is, I offer a and then boom. And then we have images, videos, and slideshows, and then... So that's our blue ad. But then we have the one here of my son. So it's like constantly ting, ting, ting. It's going through and split testing these for us. And then with this, the image of my son, we also see all of the different variations. I didn't add any variations for the bear line or the description, but those work too. So any questions on the ad setup? You can do videos here too. You can add videos and rotate between videos. Any questions here?

Speaker 6:
Maybe yes? No, looks good. All right cool. Everybody's just overwhelmed now. They're like...

Speaker 10:
I have a question for us.

Speaker 6:
Good.

Speaker 10:
Facebook live video.

Speaker 6:
Yeah. Yeah, Facebook live streams are great. Yep. If you can do Facebook lives, do Facebook lives. You end up getting... You can boost Facebook lives and Facebook is capturing all the people who watch those videos and putting them into a custom audience for you. There isn't a better marketing tool at the moment than Facebook lives, in my opinion. And especially if you're queuing low cost, cheap marketing. It's such a great way of assembling an audience.

Speaker 10:
All right thanks.

Speaker 6:
Yep.

Speaker 7:
I have a question.

Speaker 6:
Sure. The question?

Speaker 7:
Did you catch that?

Speaker 6:
Oh no I didn't, I just heard, "I have a question."

Speaker 7:
I'm sorry.

Speaker 6:
Oh no worries.

Speaker 7:
My Internet's being weird. My question is, does it make a difference if you're wanting to promote an already existing post or if you're wanting to create the post? Is there any difference in that?

Speaker 6:
No, well... If you promote an already existing post, then you have the history of that post. If there's already likes and comments and everything, then you're just boosting that already published posts, which is great because you already have some social ability on it. If you are... Or you can just create the ad which is... All an ad is, is an unpublished post. So it's a post that doesn't have a home and then you can stop running the ad and it disappears. So a lot of times, if you want the thing to live on your web, to live on your page, then do the post. Throw the post up. But if you think that it maybe shouldn't live on your page or it's just a little promotion or whatever, then do it as an ad and then just run it. There's a lot of times we split everything and how the post works is, once you publish the Facebook post and then you start running traffic to it, then you can no longer edit that post anymore because it has to go through approval again.

Speaker 7:
Okay.

Speaker 6:
So most of where we spend our time is in here setting up these things.

Speaker 11:
Time is in here sending up these things.

Speaker 12:
I don't know if it's right, but I've also... When I boosted a post, I don't remember getting all those-

Speaker 11:
You didn't get all those.

Speaker 12:
I got the targeting options, but I didn't get the option of the learn more, shop now. I don't feel like I ever saw that.

Speaker 11:
No. You didn't. When you boost from a page, it's a very generic version of ads. It's still ads. I'll have a client, they'll email me and say... Or they'll send me a message and they'll say, "I boosted my post." And I'm like, "Okay." And then I know that I have to go fix it because it'll be an active ad and they'll be spending $20 a day or whatever on it. It would be an active ad in their ad manager, but I have to go in and make sure that the targeting is good and the segments are good. I do all that back here because they don't have it on the front side of the house.

Speaker 13:
Hey guys, I'm going to let you keep going. I have to start a class at 5:30, so I'm to leave this Zoom going so you guys can continue until you're done whenever you are.

Speaker 11:
Cool.

Speaker 13:
Okay. Sounds good?

Speaker 11:
Yeah.

Speaker 14:
It's all right. Thanks.

Speaker 11:
Are you recording this?

Speaker 13:
Yes.

Speaker 11:
All right. Cool.

Speaker 13:
Is that okay?

Speaker 11:
Yeah. Perfect. No, I'm like, "This is actually going pretty well. It's awesome." See you. Have fun.

Speaker 11:
Okay. So live streams. So this isn't just the live stream that we did in... I don't spend a whole lot of money promoting these things. I think if we look at the last... So if we do lifetime with these guys, I spent 200 bucks. I mean, nothing. So what they did, though? So if we can go through and look at, we pull down the columns and we sort to these by video engagement, then we can see what that actually got us. So these live streams are 25 to 30 minutes of me talking like this. Literally it's probably the... I mean, unless you're in... And maybe if you're into this kind of thing, then it's probably kind of enlightening, but otherwise, I can't say it's incredibly exciting.

Speaker 11:
But like this one, it was a live stream on how to create automated webinars. I spent $125 on it. Those $125 got me 28,000 impressions. So that thing actually loaded for 28,000 people. Of those 28,000 people, 3000 actually watched two seconds of it, or two seconds of it continuously. There was 12,000 people who watched three seconds. 7,000 people who watched 10 seconds. So 7,000 people listened to me for 10 seconds on $125. To me, that is mind-blowing. 125 bucks. Like you can't... I mean, with TiVo now you run a TV commercial, and everybody's just zooming past it if it even shows at all. Not TiVo. DVR. With $125 we reached 15,000 people. 15,000 business owners, our ideal customers.

Speaker 11:
And also for that $125, 112 of them watched my entire 27-minute long presentation about how to set up an automated webinar. 112 people, meaning 112 people were scrolling their Facebook feed, saw my video and then sat back and watched me for 27 minutes. In the middle of their day. For $125. Like, what? It's just crazy to me. I don't do anything for 25 minutes in a row except talk to my computer or play Nerf guns with my son [inaudible 00:04:12].

Speaker 12:
Did you boost it before you did the video or after do the video?

Speaker 11:
After.

Speaker 12:
How does the money part become part of your live stream?

Speaker 11:
So after the video was done, then I went in here and I added... So basically I go in here and I... So I just duplicate. So with... Remember it goes to campaigns, ad sets, ads. So I'm in the ad section now. So all I do is I just... I'm replacing that ad. I could actually do it for the live stream that I did this morning. So I'm just going to duplicate this ad and then I'm going to swap out. So this... What did I talk about this morning? Oh, geez. It's been a long day. Service professionals? How to create and sell services online. That's what I talked about.

Speaker 11:
In my post, I'm going to use the existing posts from this morning, and then I'm going to change the post and that's going to be this GSDdallyO44, was my Livestream. And then I'm just going to hit continue, and it'll swap out. And this is the... So I did this one. Yeah. May 14th. I did this one earlier today. And then that's it. So I just said, "Publish." And now that thing is gone. Well, after it gets approved, but it'll be live in a minute.

Speaker 11:
Yep. So any questions? We're good so far?

Speaker 11:
Okay. All right. So I think the next place we probably go to is audiences, right? Pixels and audiences? Talk about setting up those audiences? Okay. So in the ad manager... There's a couple of different kinds. So Beth brought this up, actually, when we did this last time. There's a couple of different ad managers. So they kind of roll out ad managers to their advertisers and chunks. So mine might look a little bit different, but generally, the location of things is the same. So when you hit this dropdown, it might look a little bit different, but you're looking for audiences. That's always the word they use is audiences. Like events manager... Your pixel information is in here a lot of times now, but we're going to go into audiences.

Speaker 11:
So now your audiences are here. So the best audience that you can create early on is the one you upload. So this is going to be like your prospects, your email list, your customer list. If you have... I have my very, very, very first client ever was a company in Northeast here. And they had... 180? No, 18,000 customers that they actually were at work. This is 14 years ago, but they were collecting email addresses way back then. So now, they could actually just upload their list, create a custom audience, and say... Oops, there we go. So I hit the wrong button. So we're going to go back to the ad manager. Then we're going to go to audiences. Then from audiences, we're going to go to create audience. And then we're going to create a custom audience. So the custom audience can be... There are lots of different sources.

Speaker 11:
The one you're probably going to use most often at the earliest is this customer list. So if you have a list like a customer data, then basically you select... It will match up your customer's email, their phone number, the other stuff you probably don't have. First name, last name. If you have it, then that's cool. You can include some more identifiers. You don't need all that stuff. You just really need the email. So basically you hit next. And then because you're listing include a column for customer value, because they do customer value tracking. So if you have data like this person is worth $1,200 or whatever, you can upload that, but we don't. So then hit next. Then you have to require... You have to agree to these terms. It's basically like you're not spamming people. Hit I accept. And then you just drag your list in here. So I don't know what I have...

Speaker 11:
Let me find that list somewhere because this is important, I think. Would this work? Yeah. Oh, here we go. All right. So this is my entire... This is add list. I don't know. I think there are 46,000 people on this list. So this is like a list of all of our Active B2B Prospects. So I pulled the list in here and then this is going to be Active B2B Prospects. So these aren't buyers, they're just prospects, but they're emails that we already have.

Speaker 11:
So we're going to hit next. And then what this is telling us is here's our email list, so these are emails and we're mapping this information. So we have email addresses. Then we have a country. Then we have a phone number. I don't know how many phone numbers, because what we do with them, that's a phone number, but I do have some, so there's a phone number right there. And then PayPal address, which is... We're just going to say, do not upload on this guy. Because it doesn't make sense. Office phone. We're not going to upload that one. SMS. We're not going to upload that one. Country. We can upload it, but it doesn't really matter.

Speaker 11:
So then we're going to upload and create. So what it's doing right now is that it's going through the list by list... Read line by line and match up to our email addresses with everybody that it hasn't filed. So there's the first 10,000 people. There are the next 20,000 people. So this is 23,000 people that I uploaded into Facebook. So now I can go and target them using an ad. So I now have 23,000 people. I've already done this, but this is some of what makes up our other audiences. So these 23,000 email addresses, I can show them specific ads. I can also use them as a lookalike audience to find my next two million buyers.

Speaker 11:
So then there would be Active B2B Prospects, and then we selected the audience location. So we're creating a lookalike audience now. So the United States. The audience size... So how it works is the bigger audience size you want, the less targeted is. 2.4 million people just like my ideal customer is a whole lot of people that I won't ever spend enough money to get in front of all of them. But if you want to be really, really ambitious, you can go to like 10% of people. And that's 23 million people who are just like your ideal buyers. That's your estimated reach. So that's 10% of all of the people in the US who Facebook thinks are like yours. Crazy dark. I'm okay with my little list. 2.4 million people.

Speaker 11:
Now, similarly, if you want to target a different country, I have clients from the UK, I have clients in Canada, I have clients in New Zealand and Australia. So if I want to reach out to them, like right now, for whatever reason, I'm really popular in the United Kingdom so I can just find an audience in the United Kingdom and I'm dropped down to 453,000. I also like my idea of buyers, but I came from a smaller one. So that's how you create the lookalike audience. And all you do is to create an audience and then it populates it in the background.

Speaker 11:
So you have something that looks like this. It's a lookalike audience of the United Kingdom, it's 1% and it's Active B2B Prospects. And then it's ready now, meaning that you can use it, but it is still populating. So it's not done yet. Another thing to think about is the list that you upload to Facebook, it's going to match about 60% of those leads. It's not going to match a hundred, so not everybody on your list is going to... Facebook is going to know their email address. It's a little bit more targeted if you upload two identifiers, which are like email and phone. Then it's one or the other because a lot of people use their cell phones for their Facebook profile.

Speaker 11:
So if you have phone data, you can upload that. Then if we go back to the ads, we'll actually pull this audience and we can select the type. So where's the ad that we... Where's the ad that we set up. So we're going to go back to the ad manager and we're going to look for the ad that we set up. I'm just going to pull that audience so you can see where it ends up going. So in the ad sets, we're going to log in to edit the ad set, and then we're going to go to the audience. And then the audience. There's that lookalike audience. Lookalike GB 1% Active B2B Prospects. And if we wanted to just do a retargeting campaign where we weren't targeting like cold traffic people, then I would just add that B2B list, that 22,000 person list. So I'm just retargeting people who already know about me and then going from there. Does that help?

Speaker 14:
I have one question for you again.

Speaker 11:
Yeah.

Speaker 14:
I already uploaded that list long ago. If I upload it again, does it resolve duplicates?

Speaker 11:
Yeah. So what I would probably do is I would delete out that previous audience and then upload it again. So your custom audience itself, once it's uploaded it doesn't evolve. So it uploads, it matches the emails, it stores them in a space and then it doesn't evolve past that. So if you upload them now, then you're going to get a bunch more matches because it's been two years since, and you've already got a bunch more email addresses on your email list. So what you can do is you just go in, delete that old audience right there. Now the flip of that is that once you have your list up here, you can actually... Like this buyer's list. So if I look at the buyers list, I can actually edit that list and I can upload, I can remove my old customers like [inaudible 00:16:11]. So what they want you to do is they want you to remove the people who said they don't want to hear from you more like your email unsubscribes actually shouldn't be in this.

Speaker 14:
Right.

Speaker 11:
And you can also add your customers. So you're adding your customers into your retargeted sequence, which is fine, but if you pixel your website, then Facebook already knows who your customers are. So it doesn't necessarily-

Speaker 14:
Yeah, I did that already.

Speaker 11:
Yeah. And-

Speaker 14:
So I have to bail. I wanted to draw your attention to the fact that I sent you a private message saying-

Speaker 11:
Oh, okay.

Speaker 14:
... This is all... This is really terrific by the way.

Speaker 11:
Well thank you.

Speaker 14:
But your expertise far exceeds anything that I'm probably going to be able to get to anytime soon. So would you contact me because I'd rather have you do it?

Speaker 11:
Yeah, absolutely. I definitely will.

Speaker 14:
Okay. So [inaudible 01:35:04] is bailing out of here. Thank you so much. A really wonderful presentation.

Speaker 11:
Well, thank you. Appreciate it.

Speaker 14:
All right. We'll be in touch.

Speaker 11:
All right. Sounds good.

Speaker 14:
Take care.

Speaker 11:
Yep. See you.

Speaker 12:
I have another question on the audience part. So what if you don't have an email list, your brand new business, and you want to get subscribers? Do you just pick out who you think your buyer is and target it through those ways you showed us? Through interests, etc.

Speaker 11:
Yeah. So I think you need to have an email list. You need to have a lead magnet that somebody can download for free and advertise that way, but I really am digging this... That gets emails that I kind of showed you earlier. One of the places you can export those emails is your Facebook audiences. So you can actually assemble your audiences from the people who are already coming to your website, which is incredibly powerful. And they don't even opt-in. It's just like they literally land on your website and then the service matches them up to their IP address and put their email address and then it adds them to Facebook for you.

Speaker 12:
Okay.

Speaker 11:
Which is pretty, pretty cool. Yeah. Can you say hi? Do you want to say hi? No. You don't want? Oh, come on.

Speaker 15:
Hey John, this is Linda. I have been listening and I probably will be following up with you too.

Speaker 11:
Yeah. Perfect.

Speaker 15:
I've got a couple of ideas that I'd like to maybe talk with Jen about and you, but good stuff. I'm not a techie at all, but I need... I was listening in to learn how I could utilize what you're sharing. So thank you. Good job.

Speaker 11:
Yeah, absolutely. Well, thank you. I appreciate it.

Speaker 15:
Okay, bye now. Have a good day.

Speaker 11:
See you.

Speaker 15:
Bye ladies.

Speaker 11:
Bye.

Speaker 12:
Bye.

Speaker 11:
The one thing I was [inaudible 01:37:08] the one thing I was trying... I wanted to get before [inaudible 01:37:12] was... So the lookalike audiences, they're constantly evolving. They live on in perpetuity. So where your custom audience is fixed, you upload your 500 or a thousand people, and then that audience just kind of stays there in a ball. The lookalike audience is constantly evolving and updating. So if you see here, there's this little update number. So it's last edited and it was created, but it's updating to always match the newest people that are entering and leaving your space. So that's an important thing. What else? What else can I show you guys?

Speaker 14:
Going way back, I have a question about the pixel that you recommended putting on your website. Is that something that you put on your... So you're saying you put it on your website and it will gather the information that people that visit your website and you can use that as the audience.

Speaker 11:
Yep. So how you set that up to its kind of like the second level of the audience. So basically we have created an audience, custom audience, and then... Oh man, I did it again. Custome audience and then website. So when you click this, what it's doing is it's saying, all right, my DFY pixel, which is the pixel that's on my website. What we're doing is we're putting together an audience of all of our website visitors for the last 30 days. So that means they're going to be... If they've been to the website in the last 30 days, they're going to be pretty warm. So warm website visitors. 30 days or something. And then we create the audience and then that audience is now saved into the platform that we can go-

Speaker 14:
How are you getting this pixel on your website? Does your web designers know how to do that or...

Speaker 11:
Yeah. Well, so oftentimes if you go... So also in this little dropdown box, they usually sneak it under events manager. They moved it around a couple of times. Jen was even like, "Where is it?" And I'm like, "I don't know where it is in your account. Give me a couple of minutes so I can find it." But ours is right here. So I'm underneath events manager and now we have the DFY pixel. And if you don't have it, this screen right here would actually set up your pixel.

Speaker 11:
So we're going to go into the DFY pixel, just click on that thing. And there is so much really incredible information here. So where you find it is you hit that little setup box right there, and then you install it and it will give you a couple of questions, a couple of things. So you can add it through another piece of software, which probably isn't... If you're using like Google analytics, you can edit that way. The best and easiest way is probably just mainly add it to your website. So what are you using for your website?

Speaker 14:
What do you mean, what am I using?

Speaker 11:
Yeah. Like what CMS, content management system. How was your website built? Is it like Wix or is it like WordPress or...

Speaker 14:
All that went over my head. I have a couple of web designers that take care of it for me.

Speaker 11:
Oh, okay. Then all you have to do is just hit email instructions and then put their email address in right here.

Speaker 14:
And they would do that. Okay.

Speaker 11:
Yeah, super simple. Just adding the script. Yep. Super, super simple.

Speaker 14:
Okay. And is that something that works for Instagram as well?

Speaker 11:
Yeah. Facebook owns Instagram, so the pixel actually picks up all of your visitors on Facebook and Instagram. So simply. Good.

Speaker 14:
Okay.

Speaker 11:
And then from here... So if you want to dig into the data at all, you can see... So in the last 30 days, there's been a total of 12,000 events on my website, 165 lead. 60 have scheduled calls. So that's like just kind of some pixel data and it tries to figure out what people are doing on the website and you can set it to figure it out or... It's getting much smarter. But if you look at some of these page views and then you can track the activity and... Like this person. So this person, there was a browser on who came to this page, it knows who... All of this data... There's a person attached to this. It's just incredible how much data they have on everybody. It's just ridiculous. And they're giving it to us obviously, so we can mark it better. So did that help with the pixels?

Speaker 14:
Yeah. I get the idea.

Speaker 11:
Okay.

Speaker 14:
Give it to somebody else to handle.

Speaker 11:
Yeah, that will work. Give it to somebody else.

Speaker 12:
Thank you so much for all your help. I'm going to go and do that, get the emails, and see what happens.

Speaker 11:
Yeah, it was surprising. It was really surprising at how well it went. It just started firing off emails. I don't even think I added it to the website. And then before you knew it, it was all of a sudden, it was like, "Tin, tin, tin". And I was like, "Holy shit." Like, "These people haven't opted in. I don't know who these people are." Just like [inaudible 01:43:11]. And then you pick your plan based on the traffic you're getting. And then if it doesn't match it up like 30% of the people who are coming and I'm like, "Well, 30% is a whole lot better than 0%, which is what I'm getting. Just random traffic." So yeah, I was pretty impressed by that.

Speaker 12:
All right. Well, I'll see what it does. Thank you.

Speaker 11:
Yep. No problem. If you guys have any questions, just let me know.

Speaker 12:
All right. Thank you. Bye.

Speaker 14:
I really appreciate your time.

Speaker 11:
No problem. Bye.